New Orleans

So, the original idea was to do a single painting with New Orleans as the background. Now I’m thinking a second one may be on the horizon.

I’ll be starting work on the first one very soon, as the second one takes shape a bit more. Interestingly enough, for me anyway, the first piece comes out of sketches I’ve had for years. It’s always interesting to go back into the folders and revisit places I’ve been, because they always have something to offer in the present day.

Back soon.

The Jazzmen

Last year, I decided to make a relatively small change to the name of the series. The musician series had been known as The Darryl Daniels Jazz Collection for the better part of 10 years. I thought it was time to give the series a name that reflects what it is about, which is the musicians. So the new name for the series is, “The Jazzmen”.

Q & A: Music and Painting

Question: Hello, I’m curious about one aspect of your creative process. Do you actually listen to jazz while you paint? If so, how does it help you creatively? Christina R., Warrick, Rhode Island

Thanks for the questions, Christina. Listening to music is something I sometimes do when painting, but not always. But let me say that I consider the “creative process” and the painting process to be primarily two separate things, I’m sure other artists have a different take on this. For me, speaking only for myself, the true creative aspect of a painting is in the development of the idea, particularly in the sketch and color. By the time I’m actually painting, I’ve pretty much worked out all the aspects of what I want to do in that piece. It then becomes a matter of just going in and painting the piece the way I see it in my head.

Regarding music again, I used to have a kind of  ‘ritual’ where I would sit down, usually on a Saturday night, and sketch while listening to a new piece of music for the first time. I found that it made me listen better and made the sketching process feel less like fishing for an idea. It was just kind of relaxing and, inevitably, a few ideas would emerge from those sessions. I don’t do that very much anymore. Instead, I’ve developed another methodology for sessions which I’ll write about in an upcoming post, as that’s kind of an answer to another question. Thanks for writing.
Have a question? Send it to: qa@ darryldaniels.com

I’m Honored

Recently, a young lady named Bree wrote me because she was working on an artist appreciation project for her son’s 5th grade class. She asked if I wouldn’t mind answering a couple of questions for the class for her presentation. I agreed. The questions dealt with what I liked about 5th grade (Mrs. Williams, one of my favorite teachers), what musical artists I enjoyed, whether I played a musical instrument, favorite color and things that 5th graders might want to know.

Ten days, or so, later, I received a message from Bree saying, “I just wanted to show you what your art inspired the 5th graders to do!”. The picture below was attached.

I love it, kids. I’m honored. Thank you.

Q&A: Artist Influences

Question:  Dear Mr. Daniels. On your bio you mention that Norman Rockwell and Salvador Dali influenced you as a young artist.  Are there the works of other artists you admire or respect?  Jacques R. from Marseilles, France.

Thanks for writing, Jacques. In answer to your question, there are so many artists whose work I appreciate. I wouldn’t say that any of them had a direct effect on me as I discovered most of the artists I appreciate after I had found my identity as an artist. When you’re a young artist, it’s so easy to be influenced by the style and work of more established artists. I tended to be more inspired by photographers and artists whose work was more visible in commercial productions. I learned about Dali and some other artists I admire much later, and I’m really grateful that it worked out that way. I think if I had been exposed to a lot of those artists I would have spent more time to trying to mimic them and not finding my own way.

Today, I can say that I can say I truly appreciate the work of Edward Hopper, Jacob Lawrence, M.C. Escher, Keith Haring, Andrew Wyeth, and Claude Monet among predecessors. Among others today, I really like what Keemo, Ilene Richard and Rudy Gutierrez are doing. Hope that answers your question sufficiently.

 

 

Ode to Jack Davis

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A great man named Jack Davis passed away recently.  Most people don’t know him by name, but if you’re over the age of 40, you’ve seen his work. Jack was an incredible illustrator and cartoonist whose work appeared in and on so many publications. His work was a great inspiration to me as a younger artist. He could work in so many styles and I endeavored to be as good a caricaturist as he was, but that was never in the cards. He was brilliant and I wanted to add my appreciation to all those that are being extended.

Questions & Answers

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I often receive emails on various aspects of my creative process, interests. I receive other inquiries with questions for my opinion about various things, so I thought I’d use this space to answer and share my thoughts from time to time.

I have a few replies I’ll be posting about soon. If you have a question or comments as well, send it to: qa@ darryldaniels.com . I can’t guarantee that I’ll be able to answer all of them, but I will do my best to respond as many as I can as soon as possible.

Coming This Fall: Jazzmen Limited Edition Canvases

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We’ll be launching limited edition canvas prints of some never released pieces this fall. This will be high-quality canvas reproductions released in less than 300 per edition. They will only be available for a limited time and will not be published in canvas edition once all product is sold.

A site for purchasing these and other prints is in the works and will be online soon as well.

Presenting “The Building Stage (Detroit)”

It’s officially completed. “The Building Stage” is  the culmination of a year of research and development. It’s the largest and the most detailed painting I’ve ever produced, measuring 4-foot by 2-foot .

The idea to produce the piece came from my seeing a print ad for one of the Big Three car companies, in which several buildings from the downtown Detroit skyline were featured. The  Chrysler House and First National buildings were among the 1920’s-era structures in that ad and both are a part of “The Building Stage”.

The real challenge of this piece was finding the layout that struck the right balance between the musicians and buildings.  Continue reading